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Now I have a place to call my own Now I have a house to make a home Now I have a seat upon a throne Cause now I have a place to call my own. Please click here if you are not redirected within a few seconds. When the rains, they pours Life can be so lonely But the faith of the storm Makes the way less heavy This life can seem so unfair but who cares If I can rise up then I will get there Cause I'm looking for a place to call my own I'm looking for a house to make a home I'm looking for seat upon a throne I'm looking for a place to call my own The hardest place to go Is where I've never gone before It takes a brave, brave soul But it makes you much stronger Related.

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Love, love, love this book, and it makes me want to go build something of my own. I really wish there had been more description or illustration or even a glossary of building terms - descriptions of parts of a window sill, for example, use a lot of terminology I wasn't familiar with, and I had to put the book down often and wade through Wikipedia to try and figure out what was going on. Oct 19, Aron rated it really liked it Shelves: biographical , make-stuff. I'll preface this review by mentioning that I have or at least had little to no interest in carpentry, woodworking, or even architecture.

After having read the book, I can say that I seriously doubt people of those professions were in his target audience, though much of the content obviously falls within those areas. I think it aims a little more directly at those contemplating picking up a new hobby, though it's aiming with a shotgun rather than a rifle. Personally, I picked the book up simpl I'll preface this review by mentioning that I have or at least had little to no interest in carpentry, woodworking, or even architecture. Personally, I picked the book up simply because I love Pollan's writing - not only his style, but also the way he draws so much else into the conversation.

And my word choice there was deliberate, as his tone is far more conversational than anything else. Checking out some of the reviews on Amazon, though, it's apparent that his writing isn't universally loved. Yes, he uses "complicated" sentence structures, and yes, he has an extensive vocabulary.

Alicia Keys - A Place Of My Own (iHeartRadio 2011) [Audio HQ]

Most authors do. I had to look up a dozen or so words over the course of the pages obstreperous? It just flows that well, as any good writing does. If you take the time to read the review that attempts to parody Pollan's style and downgrades the book because of it , you'll understand why the reviewer had such a difficult time with the book. I'm no literature snob, but hyphens and semicolons really aren't that complicated. Here's a passage that the reviewer I mention above probably hated, but I enjoyed enough to quote obviously : "I remember as a teenager reading that Marshall McLuhan had likened opening the Sunday paper to settling into a warm bath.

The metaphor delivered a tiny jolt of recognition, because I too found reading - reading almost anything - to be a vaguely sensual, slightly indulgent pleasure, and one that had very little to do with the acquisition of information. Rather than a means to an end, the deep piles of words on the page comprised for me a kind of soothing environment, a plush cushion into which sometimes I could barely wait to sink my head.

More often than not, I could remember almost nothing the moment I lifted myself out of the newspaper or magazine or paperback in which I'd been immersed. Not that I usually bothered to try. Mostly I just let the print wash over me, as if it were indeed warm water, destined to swirl down the drain of my forgetfulness. The references and discussions in this book range from Frank Lloyd Wright to Plato, from Thoreau to Ayn Rand and Thomas Jefferson and feng shui exercises involving running downhill in imitation of water.

In my opinion, Pollan accomplishes all this without sounding pretentious, but I guess I can see how his latitude could be seen that way. I have Walden and The Fountainhead sitting on my to-read pile, but I still understood and appreciated the references. If anything, they only made me more motivated to read the original sources.

And that last sentence could summarize my entire review for this book.

Pollan's writing encourages and rewards reading, and this is an excellent example of it. He delves into plenty of material related to what the title suggests, but those weren't the highlights for me. Maybe I'll continue this review at another time to touch on those aspects, but I'm sure other people have already done so. Michael Pollan dreamed of a small building on his property that he could go to in solitude and read and write. Just a place of his own with a nice view that added to his property and didn't seem like an out building plopped up in the backyard.

He really wanted something that he could easily enough build himself, but he soon found that he needed s Michael Pollan dreamed of a small building on his property that he could go to in solitude and read and write. He really wanted something that he could easily enough build himself, but he soon found that he needed some help. So much more went into creating his "simple vision", but what he was left with was exactly what he wanted and needed. I've read Pollan's Food Rules and enjoy his straight talk with a little sarcastic humor.

I think many people can relate to wanting to build a dream home or some dream space to call their own. This book is a reminder that you sometimes have to work hard for your dreams and that they may not always be as easy as you think. If you ever plan to build, you may want to peruse this book. I will say that at times he got long winded on architectural theories and ideals, but loved the underlying sense of humor he uses. Stumbled over this at the local library. The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food are both on my to-read list, so Michael Pollan was definitely on my radar, but I'd never actually read him, no essays, stories, or articles, etc.

The cover and the premise drew me in, as who can't relate to the romance of building your own cabin in the woods? Far from a simple Walden reboot, this book expertly balances two "narratives," the physical act of building, and the deeper ruminations on the histor Stumbled over this at the local library. Far from a simple Walden reboot, this book expertly balances two "narratives," the physical act of building, and the deeper ruminations on the history of architecture and how it has been informed by and at odds with nature.

He says himself in the preface that in his writing he has found his niche of fascination and creativity to be "exploring the intersection between nature and culture. When designing a chicken coop, one must be sensitive to how your birds live in nature, how many square feet are needed, roosting bars, the privacy and number of broodboxes, etc.

These natural constraints form a kind of cross section for a wide variety of creative implementations which in other contexts we call "architecture. The author keeps the pace light and entertaining, while educating, as the reader is drawn in to his very primordial instinct to build his own "place of refuge and prospect.

Jan 23, Tito Quiling, Jr. How many times do we hear people, including ourselves, keep on wishing that we can get our own place?

A Place of My Own | Natural Building Blog

Whether it's a temporary retreat house, or a permanent dwelling, having your own place seems to be a major aspect of finding stability and peace. Admittedly, with all the soaring prices for locations, and trying to get the best places, makes that wish hard to attain.

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In A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder by Michael Pollan, the need to create or build a place of one's o How many times do we hear people, including ourselves, keep on wishing that we can get our own place? In A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder by Michael Pollan, the need to create or build a place of one's own is literally taken by the author, and he proceeds to do just that. Said to have been written at a critical time in his life, this non fiction work takes the reader to a personal level, showing Pollan's driving force in his construction of an ideal place -- in this case, a writing space in the form of a four-walled structure in the middle of a forest.

If anything else, Pollan's use of the two literary classics as references makes it much more appealing, in my opinion. The author also takes us on a tour about the historical background of logging, to picking the appropriate location, in lieu of the views for one's inner peace, the different kinds of interior colors, even structural concepts that are used essentially for saving space. There are useful fascinating drawings inside that coincide with the progress of Pollan and his company's construction of the writing house.

For people who are not architecturally-inclined, the book allows one to be introduced to the practice of being aware of one's space, in order to create that elusive "place of one's own.

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May 04, Kim rated it liked it. Despite being a big fan of Transcendatalism in theory, I've struggled to read Walden and hoped this book would be my modern version. Perhaps more my fault than the author's, I was expecting a literal tale of building interwoven with a more general discourse on building and nature. There's certainly some of that present in this book, but there's also a lot of talk on architecture and its movement and meanings.

A lot. I consider myself a bit of an information sponge and love learning about a varie Despite being a big fan of Transcendatalism in theory, I've struggled to read Walden and hoped this book would be my modern version. I consider myself a bit of an information sponge and love learning about a variety of topics, but I found this very dry. I often wished the discussions of architecture included basic drawings the same way some of the construction detail sections do, so that perhaps I'd have some concrete idea what he was referring to.

This is a very "writerly", head in the clouds, theoretical take on a subject, and for me it was just too abstract. Pollan is at his best in this book when describing people. He brings his carpenter and his architect to vivid life and imbues a real sense of humor into his work with, and challenge between, each of them. The segment about how all roads lead to gun control with carpenter Joe is without a doubt my favorite few pages in the book.

The details of construction and his reverence for his materials are engaging and understandable, despite my lack of familiarity with the subject. All told, this is a well-written book that happened to miss the mark for me personally.

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The author has an engaging writing style and is thorough in his research. I learned history and current realities: the ins and outs of architecture and architects, builders and craftsmen. I learned about the process of building and aesthetic of how a house influences its owner. There were insightful comments about the history of shelters, subtle effects on relationships with people and with nature. There was much to make me look at our home and our cabin differently.

It helped me understand why The author has an engaging writing style and is thorough in his research. It helped me understand why some rooms work or feel comfortable and some don't. There were a few sections I tended to skim more info than I was interested in knowing , and in these areas I wished there had been more editing. Yet, I suspect different people may find these sections more of what they need to understand. Obviously, if you are going to build a house even if you don't build it with your own hands this book would give valuable insights.

But, even if you are settled for the long-term, I think reading the book will help you appreciate and come to a new relationship with your own dwelling. Though not Bachelard's quirky and mind-blowing The Poetics of Space , Pollan's A Place of My Own is a well-written, well-researched, approachable book on both theory and practice, thinking and doing. Having just taken a class on Building Construction, I thoroughly enjoyed the descriptions of materials and construction practices both good and bad the building didn't turn out square--oops. My favorite chapter was on Windows and the ingenious Greene and Greene solutions to in-swinging windows.

Jan 11, Amit rated it really liked it Shelves: nonfiction. Michael Pollan is a kind of guy who could make you read hundreds of pages on subjects you never thought you'd be interested in. And you may not be interested in them again after you put down the book. Case in point is this book. There is no way I'm going to build my own house, or even get it built.

But Pollan's story of his own study he built in the woods with the help of an Architect friend and a part-time contractor kept me interested all through. As usual, Pollan starts at the basics, giving Michael Pollan is a kind of guy who could make you read hundreds of pages on subjects you never thought you'd be interested in.